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Wednesday, 5 September 2007

Horrifying Moments

Redaction

One of the most horrifying moments in film is the crucifix scene in The Exorcist. That scene stands out of one of extreme drama, and, indeed, horror. I'm talking about it non-specifically because I haven't actually seen the movie. But I want to, because it's reputed to be an excellent film and a classic in it's genre. And there's a famous scene involving a crucifix which invokes horror in the audience.

The reason that I bring this up is because I fell victim to knee jerking even as I tried to resist it. Horrifying is not the same as horrible. Saying that Beethoven's 9th is a horrifying depiction of violence does not mean that it's horrible. Nor does it mean that the horror lies in people's enjoyment of the piece. Instead it means that McCleary would like to put an additional genre description on the 9th. In addition to it's musical form and it's time period, she would like to add the label "horror." A label worn by excellent works in other genres.

This sort of generic description is not often applied to musical works and so McCleary is often misconstrued. Including by me. Which is why I should not blog about books that I haven't actually read.

But what about porn?

(Musicology is so much more exciting than one might think!)

The director of The Exorcist created a film about demonic possession. However, I wouldn't say that he was advocating for the same or trying to encourage it in any way. I'm guessing most Beethoven scholars would assert that Beethoven wasn't advocating for rape. However, pron occupies a somewhat different realm in society. For starters, unlike demons, we all agree that it exists. Secondly, unlike rape, it's legal.

So I think most of my questions from my previous post still stand: Does a pron sample carry the male gaze with it ("the male audition")? Does intent matter? Does usage matter? What are the implications of whether or not they matter? Does the amount to which they matter vary over time?

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